Is Floristry Right for Me?

Working with flowers all day and making people’s day with a beautiful bouquet. Working as a florist does have its benefits, but before plunging into this career it helps to assess whether floristry truly is right for you or whether you’re letting your emotions make the decision for you. At this point take a step back and think awhile before investing the time and money looking for a job (or training to do a job) that may not be what you really want or is not quite a good fit for you.

Hands-on

Floral design is a creative job that requires a good eye for design and the ability to coordinate what you envision with your hands. Since there’s a lot of lifting and moving boxes around it also requires being physically fit. For entry-level jobs in florist shops there will be minimal hands-on creative work and more in the way of prep work, cleaning and taking orders.

People-oriented

Working as a florist means working with people. You have to like people, be courteous and have a certain amount of empathy when working with clients at highly emotional times, such as funerals and weddings. As a retail job, florists sell people on their products so you have to listen to people, learn what their needs are and provide what is right for them.

Work under stress

Florist shops can get busy, particularly around holidays and special events, so if you’d like a laid back sedentary job, floristry is not for you. You’ll be standing on your feet all day, answering phones, taking orders, working the cash register, walking around and attending to customers and preparing flowers. You have to do all those tasks (and more) and be quick about it too.

Self-employed

If you want to work as a florist there’s a good chance you’re interested in starting your own florist shop, which requires all the typical skills of an entrepreneur: hard work, persistence, resilience.

It also means long hours, working on weekends and special days like Valentine’s Day as well as getting up early to pick the best selection of flowers for the day. You then have to be on top of things, maintaining the flowers so that they don’t die.

The job also requires a lot of flexibility: driving around to pick up new flowers, dealing with customers, driving out to events, coordinating transportation and set up. And with online sales being such a strong factor in flower sales nowadays, the job can also demand a knowledge of the Internet and online marketing.

Personality type

Whether it’s your first job or a change of career, it never hurts to take a step back and assess your personality to see whether you’re the right fit for this occupation or whether you should be doing something else. Here are a couple of career personality tests you can try: http://www.careertest.net and http://www.keirsey.com. Bear in mind that these are just objective measurements that do not truly capture the essence of who you are or your passions. They are only meant as a tool to help guide you, so take their results with a good amount of discernment.

As with any occupation, those who love their work and are a good fit for the job are the ones who excel. Can you visualize yourself working as a florist? If not, why not? Be truthful with yourself. Do the attributes listed above not sound like who you are? If not, that’s OK as there are plenty of other career paths out there. It’s better to find out sooner rather than later. But if so, and you have a love of flowers and working with people, floristry could prove to be a rich and rewarding career that you’ll be glad to have gotten into.